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APS Seeks More Public Input on Inman Middle Crowding

Superintendent Erroll Davis says that little can be done to improve the situation for the current school year.

 

The superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools is asking the public for more input - and patience - to find a solution for crowded conditions at Inman Middle School.

In a letter addressed to Inman Task Force Members, Superintendent Erroll Davis wrote:

"While I remain committed to solving the crowding issues at Inman, it is clear that little that I will do at this point will have impact on the 2013-14 school year."

The letter explains that the school system needs more time to review possible sites, including sites that the school system does not own, that could house some Inman students.

Parents and other community members who want to share suggestions are invited to email school officials at InmanComments@atlanta.k12.ga.us through the end of April.

To see a full copy of Davis' letter to the community, click on the PDF attached to this article.

What do you see as the solution to the crowding issue at Inman Middle? Tell us in the comments area below.

See also:
Inman Middle Overcrowding Study Reviews 3 Possible Sites

6th Grade Academy site on agenda at Thursday's Grady State-of-the-Cluster meeting

Jh312 March 05, 2013 at 02:15 PM
Do away with the middle school concept altogether. Add Inman as a K-8 school for Midtown, Ansley and part of Va-Hi, and utilize the K-8 model at all of its feeders. Maximize the benefit of neighborhood schools with long term educational investment and involvement from parents from K-8th grade. Partner with charter schools who already successfully utilize this model in order to deal with organizational challenges. Allow Lin and SPARK to proceed with renovations/expansion with this model in mind. Keep children in a familiar environment and minimize transitions. If needed, eventually renovate the Howard site as a special resource school for children with severe disciplinary challenges in a fluid K-12 environment ("fluid" meaning to get children back to a mainstream classroom as soon as possible), or add it as a smaller high school to relieve pressure from Grady.
FamilyOfFour March 05, 2013 at 02:28 PM
That seems like a pretty good idea. :) I attended K-8 schools several times as a kid. Really liked it. The parent base was really strong like it usually is at elementary schools, but then fizzles away at a temporary style middle school, then gears up again at high school. Lots of opportunities at the schools as far as music, theatre, sports, languages, etc. Also saves on transportation costs, traffic, administration costs and more.
Asa March 05, 2013 at 05:39 PM
Solid plan!!! E. Davis fas spent a lot of resources so far, and it does not seem we are anywhere close to a solution... wasted a lot of people's time. Will be interesting to see if he listens to ideas this time, as I am sure that this has already been presented.
Mel March 05, 2013 at 07:02 PM
DeKalb had that in the 1970s/80s (1-7 and 8-12). Didn't work well -- too wide a range of ages. Went to the middle school concept in the mid- to late 80s. Worth exploring, but should be examined carefully before jumping on that as a solution.
momofboys March 05, 2013 at 07:42 PM
I love the of my kids being able to stay in their neighborhood and be at the same school for K-8. The parent & community support for the already successful schools would increase & we'd have less drop out to private. Seems like a win-win!! Several excellent k-8's that then feed into one high school. And for those kids who need extra support, like Ms. Tukes, being in a school for 3 more years would allow teachers and counselors that much more time help them & work with the families. The middle schoolers could be physically separated from the younger ones by being on different floors, but what a wonderful way to keep families together and allow multi-age learning & community grow. I can imagine middle schoolers feeling more taken care of and experiencing less uncertainty and emotional distress if they stay in their familiar env't. It should decrease the amount of busses needed, and would allow families to walk to school together, instead of shuttling 2+ kids to various schools. Some changes would need to be made to the current elementary schools to allow middle schoolers the necessary resources they need... art & music studios, theater space, science & math classroom, bigger & better library... This 6th grade academy is a black hole... nobody wants it, so Davis... listen to us parents & stop blocking better & more cost effective solutions. Let's do what's right for all of out kids, which is have excellent schools with committed communities & involved families.
Lance Weatherby March 05, 2013 at 11:09 PM
The obvious answer here is color blind geographic redistricting to create a new middle school utilizing slack in already owned APS properties.
Mark March 06, 2013 at 10:21 PM
The real reason this school is over crowded is because people from surrounding counties are using resident's addresses to get their kids in this school. I have been approached twice by coworkers to use my address so their children can attend this school and not their Clayton County school where they live.
Jh312 March 12, 2013 at 09:26 PM
I heard that the K-8 option is back on the table for Centennial. Does anyone have any information on this? Also, an interesting blogpost from AJC regarding the middle school model: http://blogs.ajc.com/get-schooled-blog/2013/03/12/anybody-out-there-want-to-rethink-middle-school-besides-me/
FamilyOfFour March 13, 2013 at 12:35 AM
Just read the Harvard Study article about K-8 success rates. very interesting. It makes sense. You move kids to a whole new school, new students, new teachers at a very emotionally unstable time in most kids. Puberty is just kickin in! :) My husband attended a K-12 school his whole life, he really liked the way you knew ALL of the teachers and ALL of the teacher knew you. They were parents themselves as well as coaches and friends of parents. Very stable situation. He doesnt even understand what it is like to be a new kid in a new school. I told him, "It is complete hell!" I dont know anyone who loved the first day of a new school. I went to 3 high schools. Not fun. :(

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